Resources

Lesson Plans

SCIC’s Global Citizenship Education Program helps Saskatchewan teachers integrate international development and global justice into their classrooms by providing free, downloadable teaching resources for high schools and elementary schools. These are lessons created by SCIC’s member organizations and have been compiled and reviewed to meet Saskatchewan Curriculum connections.

You can browse all lesson plans either by grade level or topic, using the tabs below:


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Grades 1-3 Lesson Plans

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Food Insecurity – Social Studies 3-5

Students will learn about and present a variety of positions on prawn farming, as well as benefits and detriments to various countries, with a focus on Asia and Australia. The inevitable question that students should be able to reflect on is: Should we eat prawns?

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Rights of the Child 1 – A Journey to a New Planet – Social Studies 1-2

Students will begin to differentiate between things that they want and need. Students are introduced to basic human rights as entitlements that everyone holds. Students further examine how their wants and needs are consistent with human rights and more specifically, with the rights of a child.

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Rights of the Child 2 – Polluting Rights – Social Studies, Health 3-8

Students will understand how pollution affects children’s rights and health through real life examples; the environmental problems that affect children around the world; how pollution affects children’s rights and health through real life examples; the environmental problems that affect children around the world.

Students will develop an appreciation for a healthy environment and how it applies to rights, as well as, an appreciation for a healthy environment and how it applies to rights.

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Common Threads: Weaving Child Rights & Global Education Module 1: Exploring Rights – Social Studies, ELA 3

Students are introduced to basic human rights as entitlements that everyone holds. Students further examine how their wants and needs are consistent with human rights and more specifically, with the rights of a child.

Lesson 1.1: Child Rights are Human Rights

Examine the needs and wants of children and consider the rights of all children; students will address their own wants and needs, begin to comprehend the Convention on the Rights of the Child and create a mind map about the information on child rights.

Lesson 1.2: Child Rights

Students are introduced to child rights and who is responsible for upholding the rights; students will group child rights into the four categories of survival, development, protection or participation. Students will further examine each individual category, determining who within the community is responsible for children’s accessibility to these rights.

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Common Threads: Weaving Child Rights & Global Education Module 2: Child Poverty – Social Studies, ELA 3

Students will become aware of the purpose and content of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and how child rights relate to achieving them. Connecting child rights to poverty and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

Lesson 2.1: How is Child Poverty Connected to Child Rights?

Students will begin to understand that there are many causes and consequences of child poverty and how they are connected to child rights by grouping statements as either a cause or a consequence of poverty.

Lesson 2.2: Child Rights and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

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Common Threads: Weaving Child Rights & Global Education Module 3: Exploring the CRC – Social Studies, ELA 3

Students will be introduced to the importance of child participation to promote whole-community well-being through reflection and class discussion.

Students are to examine each of the eight child rights individually through inquiry activities and class discussion.

Lesson 3.1: The Right to Shelter

Students engage in a class discussion and inquiry activity in regards to the differences in houses across the world.

Lesson 3.2: The Right to Water

Through video analysis and working with a partner, students will assess the right to water and the consequences of not being able to claim the right.

Lesson 3.3: The Right to Food

Students explore the right to food by considering facts about hunger and synthesizing scenarios with selected child rights.

Lesson 3.4: The Right to Healthcare

Students will begin to understand the difficulties faced by children (specifically children with disabilities), when access to health care is denied through a reading comprehension activity.

Lesson 3.5: The Right to Education

Students consider the right to education through a reading comprehension activity centered on a young girl living in Bangladesh.

Lesson 3.6: The Right to Play

Students will understand that play and recreation are crucial to child development and learning through analysis of written and visual materials.

Lesson 3.7: The Right to Protection

Students will be introduced to child labour and share their opinions through self/group reflection and familiarization of the Fair Labour Standards.

Lesson 3.8: The Right to Participation

Students will be introduced to the importance of child participation to promote whole-community well-being through reflection and class discussion.

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United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child – Social Studies 6

Students will read the articles in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. Then they will sort the rights into 3 categories: provision rights, protections rights, and participation rights.

Students will read the articles in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. Then they will sort the rights into 3 categories: provision rights, protections rights, and participation rights.

This is a modified concept formation task. In most concept formation tasks, there is a set of information that students must examine and sort into categories that have not been made known to them. Concept formation tasks encourage students to think critically and break large amounts of information into smaller, more meaningful, and more manageable chunks.

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Remember the Land: Global Ecumenical Voices on Mining Community Mapping Activity – Social Studies 6, 7, 8, 9

The Community Mapping Activity is designed to help you better understand the impacts of resource extraction on communities such as those highlighted in the KAIROS video Remember the Land.

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Grades 4-6 Lesson Plans

Diseases of Africa – Social Studies 6

The key feature of this lesson is a research project and multimedia presentation. Students are placed in groups of two to research particular diseases common in Africa. Students first consult reference material for information on what diseases are common and then, as part of an international medical team they prepare a presentation on one particular disease. Presentations are to include information on the spread of the disease, immediate treatments, and long range solutions, problems associated with short range treatments, costs, ethical considerations, religious beliefs, and current medical practices.

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Students are to first story-board their presentations and then develop a multimedia presentation for the class. Note: While the lesson plan refers to Hyperstudio, the presentations could take any form.


Malaria – Social Studies 6

This lesson is from the Global Nomads Group, a New York based non-profit founded in 1998. The lesson starts off by asking what the students know about malaria. From there it proceeds to the story of Kofi, a five year old boy whose parents discover he has the disease. The story details the parents’ struggle to obtain medical help, and the difficulties faced by others in their village. The lesson goes on to describe how mosquitoes transmit malaria, the life cycle of mosquitoes, and methods that have been used to lessen the effects of these insects.

Although this site provides some good, basic information, it was designed as background information for a teleconference with members of Global Nomads so no student tasks are outlined. However, student activities can easily flow from the information. For example, students could undertake further research into the control efforts outlined, investigate other disease spreading parasites, or research organizations working to provide assistance in malaria prone areas.

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Food Insecurity – Social Studies 3-5

Students will learn about and present a variety of positions on prawn farming, as well as benefits and detriments to various countries, with a focus on Asia and Australia. The inevitable question that students should be able to reflect on is: Should we eat prawns?

Download Lesson Plans

Lesson- Food Insecurity (Food Security)


Child Labour in Developing Countries – Social Studies 6-8

This activity looks at the interdependent nature of the world using industry in China as an example. It explores the idea of global citizenship using the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child as a values framework. This is a lesson plan that can be used as part of UNICEF’s National Non-Uniform Day that raises money for getting children in Bangladesh and Brazil out of labour and into school.

Learning aims

  • To be introduced to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child and how it aims to improve the lives of children across the globe
  • Learn how child labour impedes children’s rights
  • Think about how the world is interdependent and their own role as global citizens
  • To be part of/learn about UNICEF’s National Non-Uniform Day

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Giving Voice to Child Labourers Through Monologues – Social Studies 6-8

Students learn about child labour, as it occurred in England and the United States during the Industrial Revolution and as it continues around the world today.

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Child Soldier Stories – Social Studies 6

The following activity will allow students to take a deeper look at the issue of child soldiers around the world. Have students read the following excerpts from an interview with child soldiers. As students take a look at the real life experiences of these youth, have them place their feet in the shoes of these soldiers. Have a discussion guided by the questions found below.

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Child Soldiers – Social Studies 6

This lesson takes students through a journey of trying to understand how child soldiers are used.

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Education and Conflict – Social Studies 6-7

To help students to understand how conflict stops others from going to school.

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Our Connected World – Social Studies 6-7

Students will create a visual representation of global interconnection, which will set them up for a discussion on equity and trade. The success of the first seven Millennium Development Goals is dependent on a concrete commitment to uphold this eighth MDG, which calls for global partnerships to support development. The existing global partnerships benefit rich countries, especially when it comes to the issue of trade. Many countries are still struggling to pay only the interest on loans they acquired decades ago, making actual repayment of the principal impossible.

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What is Child Labour? – Social Studies 6

Students will learn about child labour, what it is, and how it looks. After learning about child labour students will take action against child labour, potentially tying it into Labour Day.

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Amnesty International – Child Soldiers – Social Studies 6-7

This lesson plan uses Ishmael Beah’s first-hand account of life as a child soldier to encourage students to expand their understanding beyond themselves: to think globally and to think about human rights. It is designed for use with film clips from Ishmael Beah’s session at the Human Rights Action centre. www.amnesty.org.uk/childsoldier

The lesson plan is for use with young people aged between 11 and 14, but it may be possible to adapt some activities to an older age group. The activities can be used in a stand-alone lesson in citizenship or in an interdisciplinary project in English or Art to encourage students to make connections between different areas of learning. The activities enable young people to learn independently and as part of a group, and to apply their learning in new contexts.

Extension activities can be used as homework or in additional lessons to allow students to develop independent study skills and their knowledge of the subject.

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Child Labour Activity – Social Studies 6

This lesson presents an overview of where, why, how, and in what conditions child labour occurs. Students will identify the physical and emotional challenges that children forced into labour face. Students will study the efforts by the international community to prevent children from working in hazardous environments.

In many places around the world children are forced to work, sometimes in brutal conditions and dangerous environments that are threatening to their lives and health. Typically, children who are forced into labour don’t go to school or participate in recreational activities. Child labour exists for many reasons, mainly economic gain. Many products we use have possibly passed through the hands of a child labourer in the process of being made. Children forced into labour deserve empathy.

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Child Soldiers: Power Relationships – Social Studies 6-7

How is it that children end up as soldiers? This lesson plan looks at the way some armies and militias “press gang” children and young people into fighting – forcibly recruiting those who otherwise would have no intention of fighting.

As with other lesson plans, you will take students through a series of discussions and activities, getting deeper into the story as you go. You need no prior knowledge – just the ability to guide students as they explore what it feels like to be someone else.

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Child Soldiers in Uganda – Social Studies 6

Students will be introduced to child soldiers in Uganda and will:

  • learn some basic facts about Uganda.
  • learn about child soldiers in Uganda.
  • understand what it is like to be a child soldier.
  • think about what can be done to stop children becoming child soldiers.

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Children’s Rights (module) – Social Studies 6-8

On November 20th 1989, the United Nations adopted the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC). This convention spells out the basic human rights to which children everywhere are entitled. However, despite the efforts to ratify this convention, to this day there are youth around the world that are still being denied their rights.

This module (4-5 lessons) is designed to help educators dive deeply into children’s rights issues. Using dynamic student-centred activities, students are encouraged to learn the facts and engage with the issues. From this process they will emerge as children’s rights advocates, ready to engage in tangible outlets to create change.

This lesson consists of three parts: orientation activities, core activities and concluding activities. For a thorough understanding of children’s rights, teach the activities in sequence as a unit plan. If you have less class time, select one activity from each section (i.e.: one orientation activity, one core activity, and one concluding activity). After participating in this lesson, students will emerge as knowledgeable and enthusiastic advocates for change, eager to take action and engage in their global community on this important global issue.

Together, let’s use education to combat apathy and encourage change.

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Child’s Work – Social Studies 6-8

Students will become aware of the causes of child labour and the effects of work on the lives of children. They will have the opportunity to explore the types of programs that might address the needs of working children.

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Child Soldiers (module) – Social Studies 6-8

In this module (10 lessons), students will learn the scope and impact of the forced recruitment of child soldiers and the actions being taken by individuals and organizations to eliminate this practice. Students will analyze primary and secondary sources, debate, create maps, discuss, design individual action plans, conduct Internet research, and write reflectively as they learn about child soldiers.

  • What is the nature and extent of the use of child soldiers in armed conflicts?;
  • What are some of the motivations for using children as soldiers?;
  • What is the impact of warfare on child soldiers?;
  • What actions have been taken by the world community to eliminate the use of child soldiers?;
  • How are youths around the world promoting peace?

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Personal Waste Assessment Student Action Activity: Class Composting Project – Social Studies 6-9

The Sustainable Schools Teachers’ Guide challenges schools to shift sustainability from textbooks into classrooms. It helps facilitate skills, such as eco-literacy, global awareness and critical thought, which students need to make sustainable decisions. Sustainability is all about learning to share resources with future global generations. Today’s youth have an important role to play in creating an environmental sound and socially just world. So, there’s no better place to start than with than youth education and understanding leading to action for a greener future.

Personal Waste Assessment

In this activity, students record and chart the amount of daily waste they produce. Students can gather personal waste data by collecting the waste they produce throughout the day. The activity is divided into three parts, giving teachers the option of extension opportunities.

Student Action Activity: Class Composting Project

Composting can be an excellent part of a school waste reduction strategy. Composting transforms biodegradable waste that would otherwise be sent to the landfill.

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Ecological Footprint; Food Miles; Sustainable Food Production – Social Studies 6-9

This unit is about food sustainability in our society.  It discusses ideas such as a
“food imprint” (how much food we eat, waste, etc).  The lesson describes ways to teach how science and health are somewhat synonymous when discussing ideas like food intake and how to properly care for food growth. It requires students to research and evaluate texts based on their value.

This unit is the first of a three-unit resource that was produced by the Saskatchewan Organic Directorate (SOD) for middle year’s learners to explore the challenges and advantages of local food production, particularly that which is embedded in a holistic view of human connection to and dependence on ecological systems. These units contextualize the benefits of local, organic foods within the larger picture of sustainability principles and practices.

Within unit one there are seven lessons which introduce students to the connections between their food choices and their ecological foot prints, and making healthy choices.

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Sow the Seed – Social Studies 6-9

This activity series is about the the global impact of climate change. It helps students begin to understand the concepts and learn how to reduce the impacts of climate change through localized farming, etc. Teachers select from the range of activities below so that students can complete the wall chart. Students use the wall chart to track their learning as they carry out these activities. Students must provide evidence of learning about the issue and also taking some action about it to complete the wall chart successfully. Students must begin by planting some seeds of their own!

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World Trivia Challenge – Social Studies 6

Students will participate in a trivia challenge where they read, learn, and compare statistics for least developed, developing, and industrialized countries.

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The Girl Child – Social Studies 6

Students will be randomly selected to participate in a simulation that demonstrates how some children in developing countries have limited or no access to a formal education. Students will be introduced to the issue of gender equality, specifically access to education.

The objective of this activity is to generate class discussion about lack of opportunity for half of the world’s population based on something over which they have no control—their gender.

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The Real Survivor – Social Studies/Health/Science 4-6

Through this interactive game, students are introduced to a range of factors that people living in poor rural communities in developing countries face that contribute to their cycle of poverty. The interactions between environmental, economic, social and political factors are stressed as each student tries to collect enough food to “survive.” Following the game, students analyze the many factors that contribute to food security through discussion and by completing a summary chart and questions as an extension activity.

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Remember the Land: Global Ecumenical Voices on Mining Study Guide – Social Studies 6, 7, 8, 9

Canada is home to 75% of the world’s mining and exploration companies. Canadian stock exchanges raise 40% of all mineral exploration capital worldwide. In May 2011, 150 people–church leaders and grass roots activists– from around the world gathered in Toronto to consider the impact of Canadian mining on the environment and the people who seek to protect it. Remember the Land is the story of that gathering. It raises questions that KAIROS encourages you to explore as individuals, as congregations, as members of institutional churches and as citizens.

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Getting Better When I’m Sick – Health 9

Child mortality in the developing world is a big concern. Every year, more than 10 million children die before the age of five from causes that are easily prevented in the developed world. Half of the children who die before the age of five are killed by five diseases or illnesses: HIV/AIDS, diarrhoea, malaria, measles and pneumonia. These children lack access to the essential services that would help them recover from the preventable diseases and illnesses that are killing children by the millions.

Students will understand the importance of vaccinations as a way to prevent disease. Students will explore the levels of health care they have access to, from simple at-home treatments to the help of healthcare professionals.

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Child Survival What’s Right with this Picture – Social Studies, Science 6

Students use critical thinking skills to determine strengths of communities in Vietnam, Ghana, Zimbabwe and the Caribbean. Students will then build on the specified strengths to identify opportunities that can potentially improve the lives of people in the community. Students will further reflect on their own strengths as a class and as individuals and use the generated ideas to improve the lives of people in their school.

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Rights of the Child 2 – Polluting Rights – Social Studies, Health 3-8

Students will understand how pollution affects children’s rights and health through real life examples; the environmental problems that affect children around the world; how pollution affects children’s rights and health through real life examples; the environmental problems that affect children around the world.

Students will develop an appreciation for a healthy environment and how it applies to rights, as well as, an appreciation for a healthy environment and how it applies to rights.

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Development Assistance Simulation – Social Studies and Geography 6-8

Students participate in a simulation to decide on the types of development assistance that are most needed and the countries` most in need of assistance.

Students gain information and build awareness and empathy concerning these development issues. The simulation provides students with an opportunity to become involved in these issues and empowered by the decision-making process.

By the end of the lesson, students will be able to:

  • identify major regions and countries in the world;
  • gather and organize geographic information from a variety of sources;
  • work collaboratively to organize and present information; and,
  • make decisions about the types of development assistance most needed in their region and the country’s most in need.

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Grades 7-10 Lesson Plans

Introduction to the United Nations – Social Studies 8: Power

The lesson begins with a reading on the United Nations and the Nobel Peace Prize. After a brief discussion of the article students are asked to write letters to the United Nations Secretary-General expressing their global concerns, the world they would like to see in the twenty-first century, and the role they see themselves playing in it.

Following composition, students will read their letters to the class for feedback and complete another draft for display.

The lesson plan also provides a mailing address where the students could send their letters. If this is done, please note: since the lesson was first posted, the United Nations has chosen another Secretary General. Letters should be addressed to Mr. Ban Ki-moon. A biography of Mr. Ban can be found at un.org/sg/biography.shtml.

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Climate Change: Creating Solutions for our Future – Social Studies 7

This extensive resource was jointly developed by the Lethbridge Environment Week Committee, USC Canada, and Alberta Environment. It includes six lessons, numerous activities, background information for teachers, and evaluation suggestions. Lessons can be used individually or as a group.

The lessons include “Picturing Climate Change” where “students learn why human activity has contributed to climate change in the past 250 years, and about the United Nations Framework on Climate Change,” “The Heat is On” that deals with Environmental Heroes in a game show format, and “The World in a Bottle” where students create a model of the Earth.

Lesson 4 is called “The World Wide Web” where “students are guided through several web sites [especially designed] for children.” In lesson 5, students examine “Human Interactions” and learn how the people in Mali, West Africa are dealing with climate change. Lesson 6 concludes the package by issuing a call for action to encourage students to become active in their school and community by sharing their knowledge with others.

Ecological Footprints From Around the World – Social Studies 8

This lesson plan comes from CHF (formerly the Canadian Hunger Foundation). In it, students will discover their own ecological footprint and will be able to compare it to that of people in various developing countries. They will also explore how their actions can impact the earth.

The lesson provides all needed black line masters and includes extra teacher resources such as a country information sheet, glossary, additional web-based resources, extension ideas, teacher background information, and a handout on taking further action. The lesson plan does not contain an evaluation scheme.


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The United Nations – Social Studies 8

Students will go to the United Nations Web site to read about the history of the UN and the role of the UN as an organization for international conflict resolution. After answering a series of questions, students will read an article by UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan. Each student will research one of the three international conflicts referred to in the article, write an evaluation of the UN’s performance in helping resolve that conflict, and provide prescriptions for changes that would improve the UN’s ability to resolve conflicts in the future.

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Cultural Characteristics Influence a Region’s Character – Social Studies 8; Social Studies 11

In this National Geographic lesson, students will analyze demographic data and explore relationships between several cultural characteristics of nations. A key component of the lesson is examining health statistics including maternal health to draw conclusions about developed, undeveloped, and underdeveloped countries.

This lesson provides some excellent country profiles that include maternal mortality rate, fertility rate, and other statistics related to the status of women in other cultures. The lesson plan eventually reveals the actual countries and through further research, the students need to draw conclusions about the nations such as “Countries that have high total fertility rates and high maternal mortality rates will tend to have poor health care.”

The lesson provides the background and the activities that will engage students and challenge their way of thinking about health around the world and in particular women’s maternal health. This lesson would be suitable for students in Social Studies 8; Social Studies 11.

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Addressing World Hunger – Social Studies 8

This lesson, from the National Geographic, introduces students to programs that exist to address the complex problem of world hunger. They will read articles about specific initiatives and projects, and will be asked to discuss these projects and whether they think they are effective. Students conclude by writing statements they would make to friends or relatives who think the world hunger problem may be irresolvable.

During the lesson, student will discuss some of the reasons why people go hungry. They will read become familiar with three organizations that are fighting world hunger, and write sentences describing what each organization does, read articles on projects aimed at alleviating hunger, label maps with the places mentioned in the articles, discuss the articles as a class, and write statements to friends or relatives who might find the world hunger situation hopeless.

Note: While the lesson is not intended as an exhaustive look at world hunger, it provides a good introduction to the issue.

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Industrial Revolution – History 10

This is a series of six lessons which are intended to give students the outlet to form opinions about the advantages and disadvantages of the current model of globalisation. Students will also be able to draw comparisons between the Industrial Revolution and modern globalization. The six lessons include:

  • Introduction: Context to Industrial Revolution
  • Cotton Industry: From Cottage to Factory
  • Urbanisation: Factories, Slums and Exploitation
  • Industrialisation and Globalization
  • Make Trade Fair
  • What can we do?

The purpose of Lesson 1, Context to Industrial Revolution, is to introduce students to the events and factors leading to the Industrial Revolution in Britain. It is also meant to give students the tools and facts they need to negotiate with the notion of progress and be critical of the effects, costs and underlying factors of industrialization.

Lesson 2, Cotton Industry: From Cottage to Factory, serves to introduce students to the notion of progress in relation to the cotton industry; it is intended to show the social consequences of this. It is also meant to have students begin to think about modern connections to the garment industry. Note: This lesson uses literary passages from Silas Marner and Oliver Twist as well as paintings by Constable and Turner to examine conditions during the Industrial Revolution. Although the paintings are not difficult to find on the Internet, the specific literary passages needed are missing (though noted as “attached” on the lesson plan). Unless teachers are thoroughly knowledgeable with these texts, it would be impossible to identify the individual passages.

Lesson 3, Urbanization: Factories, Slums and Exploitation, is intended to explicitly introduce students to the social repercussions of industrialization. It is intended to serve as a useful point of comparison to the current model of globalization and Oxfam’s campaigns.

Industrialization and Globalization, the lesson 4 topic, draws comparisons between the Industrial Revolution and the current model of globalization; it also introduces students to Oxfam’s campaigns.

Lesson 5, Make Trade Fair, is intended to give students the outlet to form opinions about the advantages and disadvantages of the current model of globalization. It is also intended to draw further comparisons with the Industrial Revolution.

In Lesson 6, What can we do?, students are given the outlet to inform their fellow students about the injustices they have experienced and learnt about. It is also intended to tie in with World Food Day. It will also introduce students to a summative task-a 15 to 20 minute presentation on an industry of interest to them.

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An Introduction to Food and Trade: Winners and Losers – Social Studies 9-12

Students will learn about food as a basic human right, free trade and how it affects food security and developing nations, and what they can do locally to make a global impact in a workshop style lesson.

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Hunger Hurts – Social Studies 9–12

Students will explore needs and wants, and how they are linked to hunger locally and globally. They will investigate global and community initiatives that provide alternative solutions to hunger. Students should develop an understanding and sensitivity towards hunger, and evaluate approaches to resolving it.

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An Introduction to Food and Trade: Winners and Losers – Social Studies 9-12

Students will learn about food as a basic human right, free trade and how it affects food security and developing nations, and what they can do locally to make a global impact in a workshop style lesson.

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Permaculture – Social Studies 9

Students will develop a working definition of permaculture. As part of a small team, they will devise plans to turn aspects of their school into a permaculture environment.

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Food and Food Security: Slowing Down our Food – Social Studies 9-12

Provides students with the opportunity to explore where their food comes from and what processes impact its arrival in the grocery store. This lesson also provides students the opportunity to discover the meaning and significance of food security, the slow food movement, and the CSA (Community Shared Agriculture).

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Child Labour in Developing Countries – Social Studies 6-8

This activity looks at the interdependent nature of the world using industry in China as an example. It explores the idea of global citizenship using the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child as a values framework. This is a lesson plan that can be used as part of UNICEF’s National Non-Uniform Day that raises money for getting children in Bangladesh and Brazil out of labour and into school.

Learning aims

  • To be introduced to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child and how it aims to improve the lives of children across the globe
  • Learn how child labour impedes children’s rights
  • Think about how the world is interdependent and their own role as global citizens
  • To be part of/learn about UNICEF’s National Non-Uniform Day

Download Lesson Plans

 


Giving Voice to Child Labourers Through Monologues – Social Studies 6-8

Students learn about child labour, as it occurred in England and the United States during the Industrial Revolution and as it continues around the world today.

Download Lesson Plans

  • Child Labour in the Industrial Revolution

  • Education and Conflict – Social Studies 6-7

    To help students to understand how conflict stops others from going to school.

    Download Lesson Plans


    Our Connected World – Social Studies 6-7

    Students will create a visual representation of global interconnection, which will set them up for a discussion on equity and trade. The success of the first seven Millennium Development Goals is dependent on a concrete commitment to uphold this eighth MDG, which calls for global partnerships to support development. The existing global partnerships benefit rich countries, especially when it comes to the issue of trade. Many countries are still struggling to pay only the interest on loans they acquired decades ago, making actual repayment of the principal impossible.

    Download Lesson Plans


    Amnesty International – Child Soldiers – Social Studies 6-7

    This lesson plan uses Ishmael Beah’s first-hand account of life as a child soldier to encourage students to expand their understanding beyond themselves: to think globally and to think about human rights. It is designed for use with film clips from Ishmael Beah’s session at the Human Rights Action centre. www.amnesty.org.uk/childsoldier

    The lesson plan is for use with young people aged between 11 and 14, but it may be possible to adapt some activities to an older age group. The activities can be used in a stand-alone lesson in citizenship or in an interdisciplinary project in English or Art to encourage students to make connections between different areas of learning. The activities enable young people to learn independently and as part of a group, and to apply their learning in new contexts.

    Extension activities can be used as homework or in additional lessons to allow students to develop independent study skills and their knowledge of the subject.

    Download Lesson Plans


    Child Soldiers – Power Relationships – Social Studies 6-7

    How is it that children end up as soldiers? This lesson plan looks at the way some armies and militias “press gang” children and young people into fighting – forcibly recruiting those who otherwise would have no intention of fighting.

    As with other lesson plans, you will take students through a series of discussions and activities, getting deeper into the story as you go. You need no prior knowledge – just the ability to guide students as they explore what it feels like to be someone else.

    Download Lesson Plans


    Children’s Rights (module) – Social Studies 6-8

    On November 20th 1989, the United Nations adopted the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC). This convention spells out the basic human rights to which children everywhere are entitled. However, despite the efforts to ratify this convention, to this day there are youth around the world that are still being denied their rights.

    This module (4-5 lessons) is designed to help educators dive deeply into children’s rights issues. Using dynamic student-centred activities, students are encouraged to learn the facts and engage with the issues. From this process they will emerge as children’s rights advocates, ready to engage in tangible outlets to create change.

    This lesson consists of three parts: orientation activities, core activities and concluding activities. For a thorough understanding of children’s rights, teach the activities in sequence as a unit plan. If you have less class time, select one activity from each section (i.e.: one orientation activity, one core activity, and one concluding activity). After participating in this lesson, students will emerge as knowledgeable and enthusiastic advocates for change, eager to take action and engage in their global community on this important global issue.

    Together, let’s use education to combat apathy and encourage change.

    Download Lesson Plans


    Child’s Work – Social Studies 6-8

    Students will become aware of the causes of child labour and the effects of work on the lives of children. They will have the opportunity to explore the types of programs that might address the needs of working children.

    Download Lesson Plans


    Child Soldiers (module) – Social Studies 6-8

    In this module (10 lessons), students will learn the scope and impact of the forced recruitment of child soldiers and the actions being taken by individuals and organizations to eliminate this practice. Students will analyze primary and secondary sources, debate, create maps, discuss, design individual action plans, conduct Internet research, and write reflectively as they learn about child soldiers.

    • What is the nature and extent of the use of child soldiers in armed conflicts?;
    • What are some of the motivations for using children as soldiers?;
    • What is the impact of warfare on child soldiers?;
    • What actions have been taken by the world community to eliminate the use of child soldiers?;
    • How are youths around the world promoting peace?

    Download Lesson Plans


    Personal Waste Assessment Student Action Activity: Class Composting Project – Social Studies 6-9

    The Sustainable Schools Teachers’ Guide challenges schools to shift sustainability from textbooks into classrooms. It helps facilitate skills, such as eco-literacy, global awareness and critical thought, which students need to make sustainable decisions. Sustainability is all about learning to share resources with future global generations. Today’s youth have an important role to play in creating an environmental sound and socially just world. So, there’s no better place to start than with than youth education and understanding leading to action for a greener future.

    Personal Waste Assessment

    In this activity, students record and chart the amount of daily waste they produce. Students can gather personal waste data by collecting the waste they produce throughout the day. The activity is divided into three parts, giving teachers the option of extension opportunities.

    Student Action Activity: Class Composting Project

    Composting can be an excellent part of a school waste reduction strategy. Composting transforms biodegradable waste that would otherwise be sent to the landfill.

    Download Lesson Plans


    Ecological Footprint; Food Miles; Sustainable Food Production – Social Studies 6-9

    This unit is about food sustainability in our society.  It discusses ideas such as a
    “food imprint” (how much food we eat, waste, etc).  The lesson describes ways to teach how science and health are somewhat synonymous when discussing ideas like food intake and how to properly care for food growth. It requires students to research and evaluate texts based on their value.

    This unit is the first of a three-unit resource that was produced by the Saskatchewan Organic Directorate (SOD) for middle year’s learners to explore the challenges and advantages of local food production, particularly that which is embedded in a holistic view of human connection to and dependence on ecological systems. These units contextualize the benefits of local, organic foods within the larger picture of sustainability principles and practices.

    Within unit one there are seven lessons which introduce students to the connections between their food choices and their ecological foot prints, and making healthy choices.

    Download Lesson Plans


    Sow the Seed – Social Studies 6-9

    This activity series is about the the global impact of climate change. It helps students begin to understand the concepts and learn how to reduce the impacts of climate change through localized farming, etc. Teachers select from the range of activities below so that students can complete the wall chart. Students use the wall chart to track their learning as they carry out these activities. Students must provide evidence of learning about the issue and also taking some action about it to complete the wall chart successfully. Students must begin by planting some seeds of their own!

    Download Lesson Plans


    Treasure of the Tar – Social Studies 10

    Students will use the Canadian Atlas to discover a vital Central Plains natural resource. They will use a variety of sources to communicate key facts about the resource in a poster format. Students will locate in the Atlas the region known as the “Tar Sands” in the Central Plains and hypothesize about the future economic potential of this natural resource.

    Download Lesson Plans


    Standard of Living Comparisons – History/Geography 10

    This lesson will expose Grade 10 students to current economic and social data on various countries around the world. The students will use the data to make comparative statements regarding Canada’s place in the world. A mapping activity will give the students a visual display of the distribution of wealth in the world.

    Students will become familiar with the diverse range of standards of living around the world, and attempt to offer solutions to the problem of the unequal distribution of wealth worldwide.

    Download Lesson Plans


    Poverty of Distribution – Social Studies, Math 9

    Susan George, in her book “How the Other Half Dies- the Real Reasons for World Hunger”, argues that world hunger is not a matter of having too little food to feed everyone, but is rather the consequence of unequal distribution of the world’s food. She suggests that the business of agriculture, called agribusiness, is focused on maximizing profit, which in many cases is a barrier to sharing food more equally.

    Download Lesson Plan


    Remember the Land: Global Ecumenical Voices on Mining Study Guide – Social Studies 6, 7, 8, 9

    Canada is home to 75% of the world’s mining and exploration companies. Canadian stock exchanges raise 40% of all mineral exploration capital worldwide. In May 2011, 150 people–church leaders and grass roots activists– from around the world gathered in Toronto to consider the impact of Canadian mining on the environment and the people who seek to protect it. Remember the Land is the story of that gathering. It raises questions that KAIROS encourages you to explore as individuals, as congregations, as members of institutional churches and as citizens.

    Download the Lessons


    Remember the Land: Global Ecumenical Voices on Mining Community Mapping Activity – Social Studies 6, 7, 8, 9

    The Community Mapping Activity is designed to help you better understand the impacts of resource extraction on communities such as those highlighted in the KAIROS video Remember the Land.

    Download the Lesson Plans


    Measuring the Success The Millennium Development Goals (MDG’s) Social Studies 7

    Students will become familiar with the dimensions of world poverty; learn about the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs); and discover connections among the MDGs.

    The Millennium Development Goals

    By 2015 all 189 United Nations Member States have pledged to:

    1. Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger
    2. Achieve universal primary education
    3. Promote gender equality and empower women
    4. Reduce child mortality
    5. Improve maternal health
    6. Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases
    7. Ensure environmental sustainability
    8. Develop a global partnership for development

    Download Lesson Plans


    When I Was Born… Social Studies 9

    Every year, more than 500,000 women die in childbirth, most of them in developing countries. While this is not an issue of concern in wealthier nations—where fewer than 10 women die for every 100,000 child births—the rate of deaths among women in the developing world can be as high as 1,000 for every 100,000 births. Poverty is the biggest reason for this disparity. The women in the developing world are dying during childbirth because they are malnourished and weakened by other illnesses and diseases. They are also more likely to have numerous births and they lack access to trained health care workers and medical facilities.

    Students will discover the range of experiences and health care services provided for pregnant women and compare the experience between North America and developing countries.

    Through discussion, both at home and at school, they will see the different experiences a pregnant woman can have based on where she lives or the poverty with which she must live.

    Download Lesson Plans


    Rights of the Child 2 – Polluting Rights – Social Studies, Health 3-8

    Students will understand how pollution affects children’s rights and health through real life examples; the environmental problems that affect children around the world; how pollution affects children’s rights and health through real life examples; the environmental problems that affect children around the world.

    Students will develop an appreciation for a healthy environment and how it applies to rights, as well as, an appreciation for a healthy environment and how it applies to rights.

    Download Lesson Plans


    War Within – Math 9

    This lesson uses math problems to explore how poverty, underdevelopment and illiteracy contribute so much to the spread of HIV/AIDS.

    Download Lesson Plans:


    Development Assistance Simulation – Social Studies and Geography 6-8

    Students participate in a simulation to decide on the types of development assistance that are most needed and the countries` most in need of assistance.

    Students gain information and build awareness and empathy concerning these development issues. The simulation provides students with an opportunity to become involved in these issues and empowered by the decision-making process.

    By the end of the lesson, students will be able to:

    • identify major regions and countries in the world;
    • gather and organize geographic information from a variety of sources;
    • work collaboratively to organize and present information; and,
    • make decisions about the types of development assistance most needed in their region and the country’s most in need.

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Grades 11-12 Lesson Plans

Child Brides: Stolen Lives – Social Studies 20 (Grade 11), Unit 5: World Governance

This is from the United States Public Broadcasting System (PBS) series NOW. It provides a startling insight into the issue of child brides in many developing countries. NOW’s production team travelled to Niger, India and Guatemala to report on a global custom that devastates lives and keeps communities from prospering.

Download Lesson Plans


Hungry for Food Security – The East African Experience – Social Studies 20 (Grade 11)

Presentation introduces students to issue of food insecurity (with an emphasis on East Africa) using statistics and examples/case studies. Students will also learn about the factors impacting food insecurity, with an emphasis on environmental factors and will be provided with an overview of some grassroots approaches to enhancing food security in rural African communities.

Download Lesson Plans


AIDS in Africa: The Scope of the Problem – Grade 11, Social Studies 20, Unit 2: Population; Unit 3: Environment

This lesson was prepared in collaboration with the Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water at the Environmental Protection Agency in the U.S.

As part of the lesson, students will learn about how water becomes impure with parasites and other contaminants; they will read personal accounts of unsafe water; and they’ll work together to brainstorm solutions to the water problems of communities in Africa.

The lesson plan covers eight class periods, but teachers may find that they will be able to cover the material more quickly. Access to a computer lab (or computer connected to a projector) will be needed to view the photos during the first part of the lesson. Students will need to use the computer lab for research during the latter stages of the lesson. They will also need access to poster board or other material for their final product.

Download Lesson Plans


AIDS in Africa: More than Sympathy (Lesson 2) – Grade 11, Social Studies 20, Unit 2: Population; Unit 3: Environment.

This is a companion lesson to The Scope of the Problem (above). It, too, is from the National Geographic. The lesson focuses on why the disastrous numbers surrounding the AIDS epidemic in Africa exist. It asks students to explore what is being done, and what can be done, to ease the situation. During the lesson, students will identify cultural factors within Africa that underlie the scope of the AIDS epidemic there, discuss worldwide responses to the crisis in Africa, list evidence of attitudes and excuses in the world that explain these responses, and determine what could be done within Africa and in the outside world to ease the AIDS crisis in Africa.

Using statistics and other readings from both the Washington Post and the New York Times students will discuss the forces at work to make the situation as dire as it is. Students are asked to develop three worldwide goals and three goals for Africa to address the crisis.

Download Lesson Plans


Sustainable Livelihoods – Social Studies 30 (Grade 12)

This lesson comes from CHF (formerly The Canadian Hunger Foundation). The site contains an excellent lesson plan that can be used as an introduction to Standard of Living, the Human Development Index, and the disparity among the world’s nations in these standards.

Students, in groups of 4 or 5, play a card game which provides them with different scenarios that either increase or decrease their overall well being. This provides a great opening into a discussion of disparities among the different nations and societies of the world.

The lesson plan includes black line masters for student handouts, background information for teachers, and an evaluation rubric. This lesson could be used when examining Canada’s economic, political, and developmental role in the world. Student worksheets are also available in French.

Download Lesson Plans


Hunger Hurts – Social Studies 9-12

Students will explore needs and wants, and how they are linked to hunger locally and globally. They will investigate global and community initiatives that provide alternative solutions to hunger. Students should develop an understanding and sensitivity towards hunger, and evaluate approaches to resolving it.

Download Lesson Plans


Introduction to African Ecosystems and Environmental Problems – Social Studies 11

In this lesson, via PowerPoint, students will be introduced to:

  • The characteristics of six African ecosystems
  • Various environmental problems that have largely resulted from poor natural resource management
  • The relationship between the people of Africa and the environment

Download Lesson Plans


Food and Food Security: Slowing Down our Food – Social Studies 9-12

Provides students with the opportunity to explore where their food comes from and what processes impact its arrival in the grocery store. This lesson also provides students the opportunity to discover the meaning and significance of food security, the slow food movement, and the CSA (Community Shared Agriculture).

Download Lesson Plans


The Gender Divide: A Different Perspective – Social Studies 11

In this activity, students take part in a role playing exercise to develop a community map from their gender’s perspectives. The different roles of men and women are explored in terms of social and environmental implications.

Download Lesson Plans


Giving Credit Where Credit is Due – Social Studies 11

Micro-finance, sometimes called micro-credit, is an alternative approach to lending that provides loans to people who would not normally qualify for traditional bank loans. In this activity, students investigate this alternative economic approach, analyze the costs and benefits and compare it with traditional lending systems. The social and environmental impacts of micro-finance programs are also investigated by students.

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HIV/AIDS, Malaria, and other Diseases Lesson Plans

Diseases of Africa – Social Studies 6

The key feature of this lesson is a research project and multimedia presentation. Students are placed in groups of two to research particular diseases common in Africa. Students first consult reference material for information on what diseases are common and then, as part of an international medical team they prepare a presentation on one particular disease. Presentations are to include information on the spread of the disease, immediate treatments, and long range solutions, problems associated with short range treatments, costs, ethical considerations, religious beliefs, and current medical practices.

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Students are to first story-board their presentations and then develop a multimedia presentation for the class. Note: While the lesson plan refers to Hyperstudio, the presentations could take any form.


Malaria – Social Studies 6

This lesson is from the Global Nomads Group, a New York based non-profit founded in 1998. The lesson starts off by asking what the students know about malaria. From there it proceeds to the story of Kofi, a five year old boy whose parents discover he has the disease. The story details the parents’ struggle to obtain medical help, and the difficulties faced by others in their village. The lesson goes on to describe how mosquitoes transmit malaria, the life cycle of mosquitoes, and methods that have been used to lessen the effects of these insects.

Although this site provides some good, basic information, it was designed as background information for a teleconference with members of Global Nomads so no student tasks are outlined. However, student activities can easily flow from the information. For example, students could undertake further research into the control efforts outlined, investigate other disease spreading parasites, or research organizations working to provide assistance in malaria prone areas.

Download Lesson Plans


AIDS in Africa: The Scope of the Problem – Grade 11, Social Studies 20, Unit 2: Population; Unit 3: Environment

This lesson was prepared in collaboration with the Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water at the Environmental Protection Agency in the U.S.

As part of the lesson, students will learn about how water becomes impure with parasites and other contaminants; they will read personal accounts of unsafe water; and they’ll work together to brainstorm solutions to the water problems of communities in Africa.

The lesson plan covers eight class periods, but teachers may find that they will be able to cover the material more quickly. Access to a computer lab (or computer connected to a projector) will be needed to view the photos during the first part of the lesson. Students will need to use the computer lab for research during the latter stages of the lesson. They will also need access to poster board or other material for their final product.

Download Lesson Plans


AIDS in Africa: More than Sympathy (Lesson 2) – Grade 11, Social Studies 20, Unit 2: Population; Unit 3: Environment.

This is a companion lesson to The Scope of the Problem (above). It, too, is from the National Geographic. The lesson focuses on why the disastrous numbers surrounding the AIDS epidemic in Africa exist. It asks students to explore what is being done, and what can be done, to ease the situation. During the lesson, students will identify cultural factors within Africa that underlie the scope of the AIDS epidemic there, discuss worldwide responses to the crisis in Africa, list evidence of attitudes and excuses in the world that explain these responses, and determine what could be done within Africa and in the outside world to ease the AIDS crisis in Africa.

Using statistics and other readings from both the Washington Post and the New York Times students will discuss the forces at work to make the situation as dire as it is. Students are asked to develop three worldwide goals and three goals for Africa to address the crisis.

Download Lesson Plans


Getting Better When I’m Sick – Health 9

Child mortality in the developing world is a big concern. Every year, more than 10 million children die before the age of five from causes that are easily prevented in the developed world. Half of the children who die before the age of five are killed by five diseases or illnesses: HIV/AIDS, diarrhoea, malaria, measles and pneumonia. These children lack access to the essential services that would help them recover from the preventable diseases and illnesses that are killing children by the millions.

Students will understand the importance of vaccinations as a way to prevent disease. Students will explore the levels of health care they have access to, from simple at-home treatments to the help of healthcare professionals.

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War Within – Math 9

This lesson uses math problems to explore how poverty, underdevelopment and illiteracy contribute so much to the spread of HIV/AIDS.

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UN Lesson Plans

Introduction to the United Nations – Social Studies 8: Power

The lesson begins with a reading on the United Nations and the Nobel Peace Prize. After a brief discussion of the article students are asked to write letters to the United Nations Secretary-General expressing their global concerns, the world they would like to see in the twenty-first century, and the role they see themselves playing in it.

Following composition, students will read their letters to the class for feedback and complete another draft for display.

The lesson plan also provides a mailing address where the students could send their letters. If this is done, please note: since the lesson was first posted, the United Nations has chosen another Secretary General. Letters should be addressed to Mr. Ban Ki-moon. A biography of Mr. Ban can be found at un.org/sg/biography.shtml.

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The United Nations – Social Studies 8

Students will go to the United Nations Web site to read about the history of the UN and the role of the UN as an organization for international conflict resolution. After answering a series of questions, students will read an article by UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan. Each student will research one of the three international conflicts referred to in the article, write an evaluation of the UN’s performance in helping resolve that conflict, and provide prescriptions for changes that would improve the UN’s ability to resolve conflicts in the future.

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Common Threads: Weaving Child Rights & Global Education Module 1: Exploring Rights – Social Studies, ELA 3

Students are introduced to basic human rights as entitlements that everyone holds. Students further examine how their wants and needs are consistent with human rights and more specifically, with the rights of a child.

Lesson 1.1: Child Rights are Human Rights

Examine the needs and wants of children and consider the rights of all children; students will address their own wants and needs, begin to comprehend the Convention on the Rights of the Child and create a mind map about the information on child rights.

Lesson 1.2: Child Rights

Students are introduced to child rights and who is responsible for upholding the rights; students will group child rights into the four categories of survival, development, protection or participation. Students will further examine each individual category, determining who within the community is responsible for children’s accessibility to these rights.

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Common Threads: Weaving Child Rights & Global Education Module 2: Child Poverty – Social Studies, ELA 3

Students will become aware of the purpose and content of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and how child rights relate to achieving them. Connecting child rights to poverty and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

Lesson 2.1: How is Child Poverty Connected to Child Rights?

Students will begin to understand that there are many causes and consequences of child poverty and how they are connected to child rights by grouping statements as either a cause or a consequence of poverty.

Lesson 2.2: Child Rights and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

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Common Threads: Weaving Child Rights & Global Education Module 3: Exploring the CRC – Social Studies, ELA 3

Students will be introduced to the importance of child participation to promote whole-community well-being through reflection and class discussion.

Students are to examine each of the eight child rights individually through inquiry activities and class discussion.

Lesson 3.1: The Right to Shelter

Students engage in a class discussion and inquiry activity in regards to the differences in houses across the world.

Lesson 3.2: The Right to Water

Through video analysis and working with a partner, students will assess the right to water and the consequences of not being able to claim the right.

Lesson 3.3: The Right to Food

Students explore the right to food by considering facts about hunger and synthesizing scenarios with selected child rights.

Lesson 3.4: The Right to Healthcare

Students will begin to understand the difficulties faced by children (specifically children with disabilities), when access to health care is denied through a reading comprehension activity.

Lesson 3.5: The Right to Education

Students consider the right to education through a reading comprehension activity centered on a young girl living in Bangladesh.

Lesson 3.6: The Right to Play

Students will understand that play and recreation are crucial to child development and learning through analysis of written and visual materials.

Lesson 3.7: The Right to Protection

Students will be introduced to child labour and share their opinions through self/group reflection and familiarization of the Fair Labour Standards.

Lesson 3.8: The Right to Participation

Students will be introduced to the importance of child participation to promote whole-community well-being through reflection and class discussion.

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United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child – Social Studies 6

Students will read the articles in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. Then they will sort the rights into 3 categories: provision rights, protections rights, and participation rights.

Students will read the articles in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. Then they will sort the rights into 3 categories: provision rights, protections rights, and participation rights.

This is a modified concept formation task. In most concept formation tasks, there is a set of information that students must examine and sort into categories that have not been made known to them. Concept formation tasks encourage students to think critically and break large amounts of information into smaller, more meaningful, and more manageable chunks.

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Environment Lesson Plans

Climate Change: Creating Solutions for our Future – Social Studies 7

This extensive resource was jointly developed by the Lethbridge Environment Week Committee, USC Canada, and Alberta Environment. It includes six lessons, numerous activities, background information for teachers, and evaluation suggestions. Lessons can be used individually or as a group.

The lessons include “Picturing Climate Change” where “students learn why human activity has contributed to climate change in the past 250 years, and about the United Nations Framework on Climate Change,” “The Heat is On” that deals with Environmental Heroes in a game show format, and “The World in a Bottle” where students create a model of the Earth.

Lesson 4 is called “The World Wide Web” where “students are guided through several web sites [especially designed] for children.” In lesson 5, students examine “Human Interactions” and learn how the people in Mali, West Africa are dealing with climate change. Lesson 6 concludes the package by issuing a call for action to encourage students to become active in their school and community by sharing their knowledge with others.

Ecological Footprints From Around the World – Social Studies 8

This lesson plan comes from CHF (formerly the Canadian Hunger Foundation). In it, students will discover their own ecological footprint and will be able to compare it to that of people in various developing countries. They will also explore how their actions can impact the earth.

The lesson provides all needed black line masters and includes extra teacher resources such as a country information sheet, glossary, additional web-based resources, extension ideas, teacher background information, and a handout on taking further action. The lesson plan does not contain an evaluation scheme.


Download PDF Lesson Plans


Treasure of the Tar – Social Studies 10

Students will use the Canadian Atlas to discover a vital Central Plains natural resource. They will use a variety of sources to communicate key facts about the resource in a poster format. Students will locate in the Atlas the region known as the “Tar Sands” in the Central Plains and hypothesize about the future economic potential of this natural resource.

Download Lesson Plans


Remember the Land: Global Ecumenical Voices on Mining Study Guide – Social Studies 6, 7, 8, 9

Canada is home to 75% of the world’s mining and exploration companies. Canadian stock exchanges raise 40% of all mineral exploration capital worldwide. In May 2011, 150 people–church leaders and grass roots activists– from around the world gathered in Toronto to consider the impact of Canadian mining on the environment and the people who seek to protect it. Remember the Land is the story of that gathering. It raises questions that KAIROS encourages you to explore as individuals, as congregations, as members of institutional churches and as citizens.

Download Lesson Plans


Remember the Land: Global Ecumenical Voices on Mining Study Guide – Social Studies 6, 7, 8, 9

Canada is home to 75% of the world’s mining and exploration companies. Canadian stock exchanges raise 40% of all mineral exploration capital worldwide. In May 2011, 150 people–church leaders and grass roots activists– from around the world gathered in Toronto to consider the impact of Canadian mining on the environment and the people who seek to protect it. Remember the Land is the story of that gathering. It raises questions that KAIROS encourages you to explore as individuals, as congregations, as members of institutional churches and as citizens.

Download the Lessons


Remember the Land: Global Ecumenical Voices on Mining Community Mapping Activity – Social Studies 6, 7, 8, 9

The Community Mapping Activity is designed to help you better understand the impacts of resource extraction on communities such as those highlighted in the KAIROS video Remember the Land.

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Food Security Lesson Plans

Hungry for Food Security – The East African Experience – Social Studies 20 (Grade 11)

Presentation introduces students to issue of food insecurity (with an emphasis on East Africa) using statistics and examples/case studies. Students will also learn about the factors impacting food insecurity, with an emphasis on environmental factors and will be provided with an overview of some grassroots approaches to enhancing food security in rural African communities.

Download Lesson Plans


An Introduction to Food and Trade: Winners and Losers – Social Studies 9-12

Students will learn about food as a basic human right, free trade and how it affects food security and developing nations, and what they can do locally to make a global impact in a workshop style lesson.

Download Lesson Plans


An Introduction to Food and Trade: Winners and Losers – Social Studies 9-12

Students will learn about food as a basic human right, free trade and how it affects food security and developing nations, and what they can do locally to make a global impact in a workshop style lesson.

Download Lesson Plans


Food Insecurity – Social Studies 3-5

Students will learn about and present a variety of positions on prawn farming, as well as benefits and detriments to various countries, with a focus on Asia and Australia. The inevitable question that students should be able to reflect on is: Should we eat prawns?

Download Lesson Plans


Introduction to African Ecosystems and Environmental Problems – Social Studies 11

In this lesson, via PowerPoint, students will be introduced to:

  • The characteristics of six African ecosystems
  • Various environmental problems that have largely resulted from poor natural resource management
  • The relationship between the people of Africa and the environment

Download Lesson Plans


Permaculture – Social Studies 9

Students will develop a working definition of permaculture. As part of a small team, they will devise plans to turn aspects of their school into a permaculture environment.

Download Lesson Plans


Food and Food Security: Slowing Down our Food – Social Studies 9-12

Provides students with the opportunity to explore where their food comes from and what processes impact its arrival in the grocery store. This lesson also provides students the opportunity to discover the meaning and significance of food security, the slow food movement, and the CSA (Community Shared Agriculture).

Download Lesson Plans


The Real Survivor – Social Studies/Health/Science 4-6

Through this interactive game, students are introduced to a range of factors that people living in poor rural communities in developing countries face that contribute to their cycle of poverty. The interactions between environmental, economic, social and political factors are stressed as each student tries to collect enough food to “survive.” Following the game, students analyze the many factors that contribute to food security through discussion and by completing a summary chart and questions as an extension activity.

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Sustainable Livelihoods Lesson Plans

Sustainable Livelihoods – Social Studies 30 (Grade 12)

This lesson comes from CHF (formerly The Canadian Hunger Foundation). The site contains an excellent lesson plan that can be used as an introduction to Standard of Living, the Human Development Index, and the disparity among the world’s nations in these standards.

Students, in groups of 4 or 5, play a card game which provides them with different scenarios that either increase or decrease their overall well being. This provides a great opening into a discussion of disparities among the different nations and societies of the world.

The lesson plan includes black line masters for student handouts, background information for teachers, and an evaluation rubric. This lesson could be used when examining Canada’s economic, political, and developmental role in the world. Student worksheets are also available in French.

Download Lesson Plans


Personal Waste Assessment Student Action Activity: Class Composting Project – Social Studies 6-9

The Sustainable Schools Teachers’ Guide challenges schools to shift sustainability from textbooks into classrooms. It helps facilitate skills, such as eco-literacy, global awareness and critical thought, which students need to make sustainable decisions. Sustainability is all about learning to share resources with future global generations. Today’s youth have an important role to play in creating an environmental sound and socially just world. So, there’s no better place to start than with than youth education and understanding leading to action for a greener future.

Personal Waste Assessment

In this activity, students record and chart the amount of daily waste they produce. Students can gather personal waste data by collecting the waste they produce throughout the day. The activity is divided into three parts, giving teachers the option of extension opportunities.

Student Action Activity: Class Composting Project

Composting can be an excellent part of a school waste reduction strategy. Composting transforms biodegradable waste that would otherwise be sent to the landfill.

Download Lesson Plans


Ecological Footprint; Food Miles; Sustainable Food Production – Social Studies 6-9

This unit is about food sustainability in our society.  It discusses ideas such as a
“food imprint” (how much food we eat, waste, etc).  The lesson describes ways to teach how science and health are somewhat synonymous when discussing ideas like food intake and how to properly care for food growth. It requires students to research and evaluate texts based on their value.

This unit is the first of a three-unit resource that was produced by the Saskatchewan Organic Directorate (SOD) for middle year’s learners to explore the challenges and advantages of local food production, particularly that which is embedded in a holistic view of human connection to and dependence on ecological systems. These units contextualize the benefits of local, organic foods within the larger picture of sustainability principles and practices.

Within unit one there are seven lessons which introduce students to the connections between their food choices and their ecological foot prints, and making healthy choices.

Download Lesson Plans


Sow the Seed – Social Studies 6-9

This activity series is about the the global impact of climate change. It helps students begin to understand the concepts and learn how to reduce the impacts of climate change through localized farming, etc. Teachers select from the range of activities below so that students can complete the wall chart. Students use the wall chart to track their learning as they carry out these activities. Students must provide evidence of learning about the issue and also taking some action about it to complete the wall chart successfully. Students must begin by planting some seeds of their own!

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Diversity Lesson Plans

Cultural Characteristics Influence a Region’s Character – Social Studies 8; Social Studies 11

In this National Geographic lesson, students will analyze demographic data and explore relationships between several cultural characteristics of nations. A key component of the lesson is examining health statistics including maternal health to draw conclusions about developed, undeveloped, and underdeveloped countries.

This lesson provides some excellent country profiles that include maternal mortality rate, fertility rate, and other statistics related to the status of women in other cultures. The lesson plan eventually reveals the actual countries and through further research, the students need to draw conclusions about the nations such as “Countries that have high total fertility rates and high maternal mortality rates will tend to have poor health care.”

The lesson provides the background and the activities that will engage students and challenge their way of thinking about health around the world and in particular women’s maternal health. This lesson would be suitable for students in Social Studies 8; Social Studies 11.

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Poverty Lesson Plans

Addressing World Hunger – Social Studies 8

This lesson, from the National Geographic, introduces students to programs that exist to address the complex problem of world hunger. They will read articles about specific initiatives and projects, and will be asked to discuss these projects and whether they think they are effective. Students conclude by writing statements they would make to friends or relatives who think the world hunger problem may be irresolvable.

During the lesson, student will discuss some of the reasons why people go hungry. They will read become familiar with three organizations that are fighting world hunger, and write sentences describing what each organization does, read articles on projects aimed at alleviating hunger, label maps with the places mentioned in the articles, discuss the articles as a class, and write statements to friends or relatives who might find the world hunger situation hopeless.

Note: While the lesson is not intended as an exhaustive look at world hunger, it provides a good introduction to the issue.

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Hunger Hurts – Social Studies 9-12

Students will explore needs and wants, and how they are linked to hunger locally and globally. They will investigate global and community initiatives that provide alternative solutions to hunger. Students should develop an understanding and sensitivity towards hunger, and evaluate approaches to resolving it.

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Child Labour in Developing Countries – Social Studies 6-8

This activity looks at the interdependent nature of the world using industry in China as an example. It explores the idea of global citizenship using the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child as a values framework. This is a lesson plan that can be used as part of UNICEF’s National Non-Uniform Day that raises money for getting children in Bangladesh and Brazil out of labour and into school.

Learning aims

  • To be introduced to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child and how it aims to improve the lives of children across the globe
  • Learn how child labour impedes children’s rights
  • Think about how the world is interdependent and their own role as global citizens
  • To be part of/learn about UNICEF’s National Non-Uniform Day

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Child Soldier Stories – Social Studies 6

The following activity will allow students to take a deeper look at the issue of child soldiers around the world. Have students read the following excerpts from an interview with child soldiers. As students take a look at the real life experiences of these youth, have them place their feet in the shoes of these soldiers. Have a discussion guided by the questions found below.

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Child Soldiers – Social Studies 6

This lesson takes students through a journey of trying to understand how child soldiers are used.

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Education and Conflict – Social Studies 6-7

To help students to understand how conflict stops others from going to school.

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Our Connected World – Social Studies 6-7

Students will create a visual representation of global interconnection, which will set them up for a discussion on equity and trade. The success of the first seven Millennium Development Goals is dependent on a concrete commitment to uphold this eighth MDG, which calls for global partnerships to support development. The existing global partnerships benefit rich countries, especially when it comes to the issue of trade. Many countries are still struggling to pay only the interest on loans they acquired decades ago, making actual repayment of the principal impossible.

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What is Child Labour? – Social Studies 6

Students will learn about child labour, what it is, and how it looks. After learning about child labour students will take action against child labour, potentially tying it into Labour Day.

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Amnesty International – Child Soldiers – Social Studies 6-7

This lesson plan uses Ishmael Beah’s first-hand account of life as a child soldier to encourage students to expand their understanding beyond themselves: to think globally and to think about human rights. It is designed for use with film clips from Ishmael Beah’s session at the Human Rights Action centre. www.amnesty.org.uk/childsoldier

The lesson plan is for use with young people aged between 11 and 14, but it may be possible to adapt some activities to an older age group. The activities can be used in a stand-alone lesson in citizenship or in an interdisciplinary project in English or Art to encourage students to make connections between different areas of learning. The activities enable young people to learn independently and as part of a group, and to apply their learning in new contexts.

Extension activities can be used as homework or in additional lessons to allow students to develop independent study skills and their knowledge of the subject.

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Child Labour Activity – Social Studies 6

This lesson presents an overview of where, why, how, and in what conditions child labour occurs. Students will identify the physical and emotional challenges that children forced into labour face. Students will study the efforts by the international community to prevent children from working in hazardous environments.

In many places around the world children are forced to work, sometimes in brutal conditions and dangerous environments that are threatening to their lives and health. Typically, children who are forced into labour don’t go to school or participate in recreational activities. Child labour exists for many reasons, mainly economic gain. Many products we use have possibly passed through the hands of a child labourer in the process of being made. Children forced into labour deserve empathy.

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Child Soldiers: Power Relationships – Social Studies 6-7

How is it that children end up as soldiers? This lesson plan looks at the way some armies and militias “press gang” children and young people into fighting – forcibly recruiting those who otherwise would have no intention of fighting.

As with other lesson plans, you will take students through a series of discussions and activities, getting deeper into the story as you go. You need no prior knowledge – just the ability to guide students as they explore what it feels like to be someone else.

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Child Soldiers in Uganda – Social Studies 6

Students will be introduced to child soldiers in Uganda and will:

  • learn some basic facts about Uganda.
  • learn about child soldiers in Uganda.
  • understand what it is like to be a child soldier.
  • think about what can be done to stop children becoming child soldiers.

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Children’s Rights (module) – Social Studies 6-8

On November 20th 1989, the United Nations adopted the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC). This convention spells out the basic human rights to which children everywhere are entitled. However, despite the efforts to ratify this convention, to this day there are youth around the world that are still being denied their rights.

This module (4-5 lessons) is designed to help educators dive deeply into children’s rights issues. Using dynamic student-centred activities, students are encouraged to learn the facts and engage with the issues. From this process they will emerge as children’s rights advocates, ready to engage in tangible outlets to create change.

This lesson consists of three parts: orientation activities, core activities and concluding activities. For a thorough understanding of children’s rights, teach the activities in sequence as a unit plan. If you have less class time, select one activity from each section (i.e.: one orientation activity, one core activity, and one concluding activity). After participating in this lesson, students will emerge as knowledgeable and enthusiastic advocates for change, eager to take action and engage in their global community on this important global issue.

Together, let’s use education to combat apathy and encourage change.

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Child’s Work – Social Studies 6-8

Students will become aware of the causes of child labour and the effects of work on the lives of children. They will have the opportunity to explore the types of programs that might address the needs of working children.

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Child Soldiers (module) – Social Studies 6-8

In this module (10 lessons), students will learn the scope and impact of the forced recruitment of child soldiers and the actions being taken by individuals and organizations to eliminate this practice. Students will analyze primary and secondary sources, debate, create maps, discuss, design individual action plans, conduct Internet research, and write reflectively as they learn about child soldiers.

  • What is the nature and extent of the use of child soldiers in armed conflicts?;
  • What are some of the motivations for using children as soldiers?;
  • What is the impact of warfare on child soldiers?;
  • What actions have been taken by the world community to eliminate the use of child soldiers?;
  • How are youths around the world promoting peace?

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World Trivia Challenge – Social Studies 6

Students will participate in a trivia challenge where they read, learn, and compare statistics for least developed, developing, and industrialized countries.

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Standard of Living Comparisons – History/Geography 10

This lesson will expose Grade 10 students to current economic and social data on various countries around the world. The students will use the data to make comparative statements regarding Canada’s place in the world. A mapping activity will give the students a visual display of the distribution of wealth in the world.

Students will become familiar with the diverse range of standards of living around the world, and attempt to offer solutions to the problem of the unequal distribution of wealth worldwide.

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Child Survival What’s Right with this Picture – Social Studies, Science 6

Students use critical thinking skills to determine strengths of communities in Vietnam, Ghana, Zimbabwe and the Caribbean. Students will then build on the specified strengths to identify opportunities that can potentially improve the lives of people in the community. Students will further reflect on their own strengths as a class and as individuals and use the generated ideas to improve the lives of people in their school.

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Measuring the Success The Millennium Development Goals (MDG’s) Social Studies 7

Students will become familiar with the dimensions of world poverty; learn about the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs); and discover connections among the MDGs.

The Millennium Development Goals

By 2015 all 189 United Nations Member States have pledged to:

  1. Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger
  2. Achieve universal primary education
  3. Promote gender equality and empower women
  4. Reduce child mortality
  5. Improve maternal health
  6. Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases
  7. Ensure environmental sustainability
  8. Develop a global partnership for development

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Rights of the Child 1 – A Journey to a New Planet – Social Studies 1-2

Students will begin to differentiate between things that they want and need. Students are introduced to basic human rights as entitlements that everyone holds. Students further examine how their wants and needs are consistent with human rights and more specifically, with the rights of a child.

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Rights of the Child 2 – Polluting Rights – Social Studies, Health 3-8

Students will understand how pollution affects children’s rights and health through real life examples; the environmental problems that affect children around the world; how pollution affects children’s rights and health through real life examples; the environmental problems that affect children around the world.

Students will develop an appreciation for a healthy environment and how it applies to rights, as well as, an appreciation for a healthy environment and how it applies to rights.

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Rights of the Child 2 – Polluting Rights – Social Studies, Health 3-8

Students will understand how pollution affects children’s rights and health through real life examples; the environmental problems that affect children around the world; how pollution affects children’s rights and health through real life examples; the environmental problems that affect children around the world.

Students will develop an appreciation for a healthy environment and how it applies to rights, as well as, an appreciation for a healthy environment and how it applies to rights.

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Rights of the Child 2 – Polluting Rights – Social Studies, Health 3-8

Students will understand how pollution affects children’s rights and health through real life examples; the environmental problems that affect children around the world; how pollution affects children’s rights and health through real life examples; the environmental problems that affect children around the world.

Students will develop an appreciation for a healthy environment and how it applies to rights, as well as, an appreciation for a healthy environment and how it applies to rights.

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Giving Credit Where Credit is Due – Social Studies 11

Micro-finance, sometimes called micro-credit, is an alternative approach to lending that provides loans to people who would not normally qualify for traditional bank loans. In this activity, students investigate this alternative economic approach, analyze the costs and benefits and compare it with traditional lending systems. The social and environmental impacts of micro-finance programs are also investigated by students.

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Development Assistance Simulation – Social Studies and Geography 6-8

Students participate in a simulation to decide on the types of development assistance that are most needed and the countries` most in need of assistance.

Students gain information and build awareness and empathy concerning these development issues. The simulation provides students with an opportunity to become involved in these issues and empowered by the decision-making process.

By the end of the lesson, students will be able to:

  • identify major regions and countries in the world;
  • gather and organize geographic information from a variety of sources;
  • work collaboratively to organize and present information; and,
  • make decisions about the types of development assistance most needed in their region and the country’s most in need.

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Development Assistance Simulation – Social Studies and Geography 6-8

Students participate in a simulation to decide on the types of development assistance that are most needed and the countries` most in need of assistance.

Students gain information and build awareness and empathy concerning these development issues. The simulation provides students with an opportunity to become involved in these issues and empowered by the decision-making process.

By the end of the lesson, students will be able to:

  • identify major regions and countries in the world;
  • gather and organize geographic information from a variety of sources;
  • work collaboratively to organize and present information; and,
  • make decisions about the types of development assistance most needed in their region and the country’s most in need.

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Industrial Revolution Lesson Plans

Industrial Revolution – History 10

This is a series of six lessons which are intended to give students the outlet to form opinions about the advantages and disadvantages of the current model of globalisation. Students will also be able to draw comparisons between the Industrial Revolution and modern globalization. The six lessons include:

  • Introduction: Context to Industrial Revolution
  • Cotton Industry: From Cottage to Factory
  • Urbanisation: Factories, Slums and Exploitation
  • Industrialisation and Globalization
  • Make Trade Fair
  • What can we do?

The purpose of Lesson 1, Context to Industrial Revolution, is to introduce students to the events and factors leading to the Industrial Revolution in Britain. It is also meant to give students the tools and facts they need to negotiate with the notion of progress and be critical of the effects, costs and underlying factors of industrialization.

Lesson 2, Cotton Industry: From Cottage to Factory, serves to introduce students to the notion of progress in relation to the cotton industry; it is intended to show the social consequences of this. It is also meant to have students begin to think about modern connections to the garment industry. Note: This lesson uses literary passages from Silas Marner and Oliver Twist as well as paintings by Constable and Turner to examine conditions during the Industrial Revolution. Although the paintings are not difficult to find on the Internet, the specific literary passages needed are missing (though noted as “attached” on the lesson plan). Unless teachers are thoroughly knowledgeable with these texts, it would be impossible to identify the individual passages.

Lesson 3, Urbanization: Factories, Slums and Exploitation, is intended to explicitly introduce students to the social repercussions of industrialization. It is intended to serve as a useful point of comparison to the current model of globalization and Oxfam’s campaigns.

Industrialization and Globalization, the lesson 4 topic, draws comparisons between the Industrial Revolution and the current model of globalization; it also introduces students to Oxfam’s campaigns.

Lesson 5, Make Trade Fair, is intended to give students the outlet to form opinions about the advantages and disadvantages of the current model of globalization. It is also intended to draw further comparisons with the Industrial Revolution.

In Lesson 6, What can we do?, students are given the outlet to inform their fellow students about the injustices they have experienced and learnt about. It is also intended to tie in with World Food Day. It will also introduce students to a summative task-a 15 to 20 minute presentation on an industry of interest to them.

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Giving Voice to Child Labourers Through Monologues – Social Studies 6-8

Students learn about child labour, as it occurred in England and the United States during the Industrial Revolution and as it continues around the world today.

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Gender Lesson Plans

Child Brides: Stolen Lives – Social Studies 20 (Grade 11), Unit 5: World Governance

This is from the United States Public Broadcasting System (PBS) series NOW. It provides a startling insight into the issue of child brides in many developing countries. NOW’s production team travelled to Niger, India and Guatemala to report on a global custom that devastates lives and keeps communities from prospering.

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The Girl Child – Social Studies 6

Students will be randomly selected to participate in a simulation that demonstrates how some children in developing countries have limited or no access to a formal education. Students will be introduced to the issue of gender equality, specifically access to education.

The objective of this activity is to generate class discussion about lack of opportunity for half of the world’s population based on something over which they have no control—their gender.

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The Gender Divide: A Different Perspective – Social Studies 11

In this activity, students take part in a role playing exercise to develop a community map from their gender’s perspectives. The different roles of men and women are explored in terms of social and environmental implications.

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When I Was Born… Social Studies 9

Every year, more than 500,000 women die in childbirth, most of them in developing countries. While this is not an issue of concern in wealthier nations—where fewer than 10 women die for every 100,000 child births—the rate of deaths among women in the developing world can be as high as 1,000 for every 100,000 births. Poverty is the biggest reason for this disparity. The women in the developing world are dying during childbirth because they are malnourished and weakened by other illnesses and diseases. They are also more likely to have numerous births and they lack access to trained health care workers and medical facilities.

Students will discover the range of experiences and health care services provided for pregnant women and compare the experience between North America and developing countries.

Through discussion, both at home and at school, they will see the different experiences a pregnant woman can have based on where she lives or the poverty with which she must live.

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